Kyle Brenon

The Great Storyteller: Week 7 (Matthew 22:1-14)

The Great Storyteller: Week 7 (Matthew 22:1-14)

September 15, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Matthew 22:1-14

This week we continue in our study of the parables of Jesus with week 7 of our sermon series “The Great Storyteller.”

Matthew 22:1-14
And again Jesus spoke to them in parables, saying, “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who gave a wedding feast for his son, and sent his servants to call those who were invited to the wedding feast, but they would not come. Again he sent other servants, saying, ‘Tell those who are invited, “See, I have prepared my dinner, my oxen and my fat calves have been slaughtered, and everything is ready. Come to the wedding feast.”’ But they paid no attention and went off, one to his farm, another to his business, while the rest seized his servants, treated them shamefully, and killed them. The king was angry, and he sent his troops and destroyed those murderers and burned their city. Then he said to his servants, ‘The wedding feast is ready, but those invited were not worthy. Go therefore to the main roads and invite to the wedding feast as many as you find.’ And those servants went out into the roads and gathered all whom they found, both bad and good. So the wedding hall was filled with guests. “But when the king came in to look at the guests, he saw there a man who had no wedding garment. And he said to him, ‘Friend, how did you get in here without a wedding garment?’ And he was speechless. Then the king said to the attendants, ‘Bind him hand and foot and cast him into the outer darkness. In that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’ For many are called, but few are chosen.”

 

The Great Storyteller: Week 6 (Luke 7:36-50)

The Great Storyteller: Week 6 (Luke 7:36-50)

September 8, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Luke 7:36-50

The degree to which we are willing to submit ourselves to Christ is a strong statement of the love we have for Him.
Often our love for Christ is hindered by our inability and perhaps unwillingness to recognize just how desperately we are in need of grace… and how sufficient His sacrifice was for our forgiveness.

Luke 7:41-48
“A certain money lender had two debtors. One owed five hundred denarii, and the other fifty. When they could not pay, he cancelled the debt of both. Now which of them will love him more?” Simon answered, “The one, I suppose, for whom he cancelled the larger debt.” And he said to him, “You have judged rightly.” Then turning toward the woman he said to Simon, “Do you see this woman? I entered your house; you gave me no water for my feet, but she has wet my feet with her tears and wiped them with her hair. You gave me no kiss, but from the time I came in she has not ceased to kiss my feet. You did not anoint my head with oil, but she has anointed my feet with ointment. Therefore I tell you, her sins, which are many, are forgiven—for she loved much. But he who is forgiven little, loves little.” And he said to her, “Your sins are forgiven.”

This week we continue in our sermon series “The Great Storyteller” as we look at Luke chapter 7 and the parable of two debtors.  

 

The Great Storyteller: Week 4 (Matthew 13:44-46)

The Great Storyteller: Week 4 (Matthew 13:44-46)

August 25, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Matthew 13:44-46

Has there ever been anything that you have wanted so badly, something so valuable that you would give up everything in order to get it? It could be something material, like that car you have always wanted (1969 Dodge Charger) or your dream home by the lake. Perhaps it is something a little less tangible. Something you have always wanted to achieve, or a goal that you have been chasing for as long as you can remember? We can certainly get carried away in our pursuit of what we would consider “treasures” even though every treasure this world has to offer, always leaves us wanting.  There is something however worth far more than we could imagine. In Matthew 13 Jesus compares the kingdom of heaven to a great treasure hidden in a field. A treasure so valuable that upon finding it, the man GLADLY sells everything he has in order to buy the field. What could possibly be that valuable? What could be of such worth that we would GLADLY give up everything we have in order to get it?                                                                         

Matthew 13:44-46

“The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which a man found and covered up. Then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field. “Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant in search of fine pearls, who, on finding one pearl of great value, went and sold all that he had and bought it.”

The Great Storyteller: Week 3 (Luke 15)

The Great Storyteller: Week 3 (Luke 15)

August 18, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Luke 15:11-24

“There was a man who had two sons. And the younger of them said to his father, ‘Father, give me the share of property that is coming to me.’ And he divided his property between them. Not many days later, the younger son gathered all he had and took a journey into a far country, and there he squandered his property in reckless living. And when he had spent everything, a severe famine arose in that country, and he began to be in need. So he went and hired himself out to one of the citizens of that country, who sent him into his fields to feed pigs. And he was longing to be fed with the pods that the pigs ate, and no one gave him anything.

“But when he came to himself, he said, ‘How many of my father's hired servants have more than enough bread, but I perish here with hunger! I will arise and go to my father, and I will say to him, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son. Treat me as one of your hired servants.”’ And he arose and came to his father. But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and felt compassion, and ran and embraced him and kissed him. And the son said to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son.’ But the father said to his servants, ‘Bring quickly the best robe, and put it on him, and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet. And bring the fattened calf and kill it, and let us eat and celebrate. For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found.’ And they began to celebrate."

 

 

 

 

 

The Great Storyteller: Week 2 (Matthew 13:24-43)

The Great Storyteller: Week 2 (Matthew 13:24-43)

August 11, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Matthew 13:24-43

24 He put another parable before them, saying, “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a man who sowed good seed in his field, 25 but while his men were sleeping, his enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat and went away.26 So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared also.27 And the servants of the master of the house came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? How then does it have weeds?’ 28 He said to them, ‘An enemy has done this.’ So the servants said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ 29 But he said, ‘No, lest in gathering the weeds you root up the wheat along with them. 30 Let both grow together until the harvest, and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, “Gather the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.”’ ”31 He put another parable before them, saying, “The kingdom of heaven is like a grain of mustard seed that a man took and sowed in his field. 32 It is the smallest of all seeds, but when it has grown it is larger than all the garden plants and becomes a tree, so that the birds of the air come and make nests in its branches.” 33 He told them another parable. “The kingdom of heaven is like leaven that a woman took and hid in three measures of flour, till it was all leavened.” 34 All these things Jesus said to the crowds in parables; indeed, he said nothing to them without a parable. 35 This was to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet: “I will open my mouth in parables;     I will utter what has been hidden since the foundation of the world.” 36 Then he left the crowds and went into the house. And his disciples came to him, saying, “Explain to us the parable of the weeds of the field.” 37 He answered, “The one who sows the good seed is the Son of Man. 38 The field is the world, and the good seed is the sons of the kingdom. The weeds are the sons of the evil one,39 and the enemy who sowed them is the devil. The harvest is the end of the age, and the reapers are angels. 40 Just as the weeds are gathered and burned with fire, so will it be at the end of the age. 41 The Son of Man will send his angels, and they will gather out of his kingdom all causes of sin and all law-breakers, 42 and throw them into the fiery furnace. In that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. 43 Then the righteous will shine like the sun in the kingdom of their Father. He who has ears, let him hear.

The Great Storyteller: Week 1 (Matthew 13:1-23)

The Great Storyteller: Week 1 (Matthew 13:1-23)

August 4, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Matthew 13:1-9

This week we begin a new sermon series called “The Great Storyteller.” In Matthew 13:1-3 we find a large crowd has gathered around Jesus. As the crowd grows Jesus steps into a boat and sets out a little way from shore. From there as the crowd stands on the beach, Jesus begins "teaching them many things through parables.” This is not the only place in the gospels where we find Jesus teaching through parables. These are simple stories used to teach us NOT so simple truths. As we take a close look at the teachings of Jesus, we quickly see that he is not only a master teacher, but a master storyteller as well. Throughout this series we will be looking at the parables of Jesus and the “many things” he has to teach us through them. Matthew 13:9 “He who has ears, let him hear.”  

"For God So Loved Nineveh" - Week 5 (Jonah 4:1-4)

"For God So Loved Nineveh" - Week 5 (Jonah 4:1-4)

July 14, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Jonah 4:1-4

For the past four weeks we have been looking at the book of Jonah in order to better understand God’s heart for those who are lost. This week we conclude our series by getting a very telling look into the heart of the reluctant prophet. After Jonah finally obeys the LORD by speaking out against Nineveh’s sin, the entire city repents of their evil ways and turns to worship God.

Seeing that this is certainly pleasing to the LORD and has brought Him tremendous glory, we would be right to think that a prophet of God would be excited to see this happen. However, we see in Jonah chapter four that this is not the case. The bitterness in Jonah’s heart has grown deep, and in many ways, it has blinded him to God’s ultimate plan as well as his own ultimate calling. 

Have we unknowingly allowed these same roots to grow in our own hearts? Are we willing to ask ourselves what we desire more? That God's enemies are brought to judgement or that they would be miraculously saved (like we were), so that the Lord is glorified in their lives?

"For God So Loved Nineveh" - Week 4 (Jonah 3)

 "For God So Loved Nineveh" - Week 4 (Jonah 3)

July 7, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Jonah 3

We are 4 weeks into our sermon series “For God so Loved Nineveh” where we have been getting a glimpse into God’s heart for those who don’t know Him, and what our response should be when He calls us to reach out. So far, we have seen God’s clear call to Jonah, telling him to go to Nineveh and call out against their sin as it has come before Him. 

We saw Jonah’s hardened heart cause him to run in disobedience not wanting his enemies to receive God’s grace. We have seen God chase him, catch him, and finally, safely deliver him to shore. 

This week we see God speak to Jonah a second time calling him to “Arise, go to Nineveh, that great city, and call out against it the message that I tell you.” This time things go quite a bit differently. 

"For God So Loved Nineveh" - Week 3 (Jonah Chapter 2)

"For God So Loved Nineveh" - Week 3 (Jonah Chapter 2)

June 30, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Jonah 2:5-8

This week we continue in our sermon series “For God So Loved Nineveh,” as we walk through the book of Jonah. Throughout this series we have been discovering God’s heart for those who don’t know Him, and what our response should be when He calls us to reach out. This week we find Jonah having been tossed off of a boat in order to calm the raging sea and has now been swallowed up by a giant fish! It certainly looks as though things have gone from bad to worse.

Like Jonah we too can find ourselves in impossible situations. Sometimes these situations are a direct result of our own disobedience. But even in our rebellion, God's grace reaches us and the very trial we find ourselves in might be the tool God uses to rescue us.

Jonah: For God So Loved Nineveh - Week 2

Jonah: For God So Loved Nineveh - Week 2

June 23, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Jonah 1:4, 1:8

This week we continue through the book of Jonah in our new sermon series “For God So Loved Nineveh.”

Last week we saw how God clearly spoke to Jonah, calling him to go to Nineveh and speak out against their sin. But instead he chose to turn his back on God, and in an attempt to flee from His presence he ran in the other direction.  

Today we look at God’s response to Jonah’s rebellion, and Jonah’s continued bitterness towards God for extending grace to those Jonah considered unworthy. Even in the midst of his rebellion, God still worked His will in Jonah’s life. God sent a STORM OF GRACE that would eventually lead to the repentance of an entire city and a whole crew of grizzled sailors!

Jonah: For God So Loved Nineveh

Jonah: For God So Loved Nineveh

June 16, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Jonah 1:1-3

When we think of outreach all sorts of things can come to our minds. What do we mean by “outreach"? What does it actually look like? What am I supposed to do about it? We can easily be overwhelmed, and if we are honest sometimes, we are quick to come up with reasons why it's just not for us. 

There are all sorts of things that might prevent us from sharing the gospel. Sometimes though, as we will see in our new series, the biggest obstacle is our own calloused heart. Jonah was a prophet called by God to speak the truth to the people of Nineveh. But his own anger towards them was greater than his love for the Lord… What about us? Do we have a root of bitterness growing in our hearts preventing us from reaching out to those who need Jesus!? What grace does God give for them and for us?


"Embrace the Weirdness" - Week Five

"Embrace the Weirdness" - Week Five

June 2, 2019 | Kyle Brenon

This week we near the end of our 6-week sermon series “Embrace the Weirdness,” where we have been looking at the fact that sometimes God calls us to do things that are out of the ordinary. In truth, simple obedience to scripture causes the world around us to take notice. Obedience to God in the world’s eyes is just plain weird! As expected, when we follow Christ, we are going to stick out.

This week we move out of the book of Acts into 1 Corinthians where Paul calls us to something really WEIRD! Starting in 12:12 we see that as believers in Christ we are called to unity. Though we may come from different backgrounds, different cultures, even given different spiritual gifts (though by the same Spirit!), we are all called to be unified in Christ. Unity in our culture right now isn’t just rare… it’s pretty weird.

Paul follows this up with perhaps the weirdest thing yet… in Ch. 13 we are told to LOVE one another. If you spend any time watching or reading the news each day, I think you would agree that one of the weirdest things we are called to do is love each other. To truly, selflessly love one another is completely foreign to this world. In fact, it can’t be done in our own strength, but only through the working of the Holy Spirit in the hearts of those who believe. 

"Embrace the Weirdness" - Week Four (Acts 19:18-20)

"Embrace the Weirdness" - Week Four (Acts 19:18-20)

May 19, 2019| Kyle Brenon | Acts 19:18-20

This week we continue in our sermon series “Embrace the Weirdness!” For the past three weeks we have been exploring the fact that God often calls us to do things that are not “normal” in the world’s eyes. To surrender to Him in ways that the world just can’t understand, and sacrifice in ways that don't make sense in their eyes. We have not been called to be “normal,” and we are not expected to think the way the world does. If we are truly following Jesus, it is inevitable that we will stand out like a sore thumb. In Acts 18 -19 we follow Paul through Corinth, Antioch and Ephesus where a complicated mix of culture, theology and politics plays out in front of him (Hard to relate to that right?!) and it all comes together in Ephesus when a riot breaks out. 

This week we look at two very different responses from those who come face to face with the truth of who Jesus really is. Some reject Him, unable to hear the truth because they hold so tightly to their own kingdom. Yet others hear and believe! They are willing to surrender EVERYTHING in order to embrace Jesus as their savior. Their response is pretty weird!

"Embrace the Weirdness" - Week Three (Acts 14:19-20)

"Embrace the Weirdness" - Week Three (Acts 14:19-20)

May 12, 2019| Kyle Brenon | Acts 14:19-20

This week we are continuing in our new sermon series, “Embracing the Weirdness.” For the past two weeks, we have been drawing our attention to the fact that obedience to God is… well, pretty WEIRD.  

We have seen that we are often willing to follow God in the things that keep us from standing out, but when our obedience to Him makes us look weird, we tend to draw the line. Even convincing ourselves that God would never ask us to do anything that would make us look weird, let alone actually BE weird. Oh, but He does!!!

"Embrace the Weirdness" - Week Two (Acts 16:25-28)

"Embrace the Weirdness" - Week Two (Acts 16:25-28)

May 5, 2019| Kyle Brenon | Acts 16:25-28

This week we continue with week 2 of our new sermon series, “Embrace the Weirdness!” When we surrender our lives to Christ, we give up the rights to self. Not just some of our rights to self, but all of them. This means everything we do, from the day we first trust Him to the day we see Him face to face, should be done for His kingdom and for His glory. We have been bought at a price!

More often than we realize, God calls us to do things that defy conventional wisdom. Things that appear to be counterproductive to our own comfort, our own plans, and even our self-preservation. 

In Acts chapter 16 we see an incredible example of this as Paul and Silas choose to allow God to use them to reach the very jailer that held them captive. Rather than walking free, they gave up their right to themselves so Christ might be glorified through them. 

Is our desire for obedience and for the kingdom of God to increase, greater than our desire for self? What true freedom Paul and Silas must have known to make such a bold move!

"Embrace the Weirdness" - Week One (Acts 5:12-42)

"Embrace the Weirdness" - Week One (Acts 5:12-42)

April 28, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Acts 5:27-29; Acts 5:41-42

Do you ever feel like you just don’t fit in? I know that is an unfair question. If we are being honest, every one of us has to answer “yes.” At some point in our lives all of us feel like we don’t belong. By nature, we have a pretty strong desire to be part of the “group.” Who doesn’t want to be accepted? This in itself is not a problem, but it becomes a problem when our desire to fit in outweighs our desire to be obedient to God! 

"The Final Word"

"The Final Word"

April 21, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Matthew 28:2-6

There is no single event in all of history that is more significant than Jesus having been raised from the dead.  On good Friday, the savior of the world was crucified. He had been arrested the night before and crucified that morning. While He hung on the cross, at about the 6th hour, a darkness fell over the land…  He was arrested under darkness, He died in darkness, and He was buried in darkness. 

From that Friday night until Sunday morning, the disciples could still feel the darkness as they feared this was surely the end. What would it mean for them now? Where would they go, and what would they do? They waited in stunned silence for something they had missed.

 Then came Sunday morning…  HE IS RISEN!

Last Words: "Father, into your hands I commit my spirit!"

Last Words: "Father, into your hands I commit my spirit!"

April 14, 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Luke 23:44-47, Psalm 31:5

This week we conclude our 7-week sermon series “Last Words” as we take a look at the final words of Jesus from the cross. After all the prophecies relating to His death had been fulfilled, knowing that the time had come, quoting Psalm 31, Jesus calls out with a loud voice, “Father, into your hands I commit my spirit!”

At about the same time something remarkable happens…
The earth began to shake, strong enough to split rocks right down the middle. Not only this but the curtain that hung in the temple symbolizing the vast separation between God and man was torn in half. TORN IN HALF!

This was not just another day, and this was not just another crucifixion. And as Jesus cried out His final words, many of those watching would realize, He was not just another man… but surely He was the Son of God!

Luke 23:44-47
“It was now about the sixth hour, and there was darkness over the whole land until the ninth hour, while the sun's light failed. And the curtain of the temple was torn in two. Then Jesus, calling out with a loud voice, said, “Father, into your hands I commit my spirit!” And having said this he breathed his last. Now when the centurion saw what had taken place, he praised God, saying, “Certainly this man was innocent!”

Psalm 31:5
Into your hands I commit my spirit; you have redeemed me, O LORD, faithful God.

Last Words: "I Thirst."

Last Words: "I Thirst."

March 31 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Psalm 22:1

“They gave me poison for food, and for my thirst they gave me sour wine to drink.” Psalm 69:21

This week we continue with week 5 of our sermon series “Last Words” as we take a closer look at the final 7 sayings of Jesus from the cross. In John 19:28, after the sins of the world had been placed on His shoulders, and after crying out to the Father in torment knowing that He had turned away from Him“Jesus, knowing that all was now finished, said (to fulfill the Scripture), ‘I thirst.’” 

There is a lot to be said about these two simple words, and a lot for us to consider. Jesus suffered from a real, deep physical thirst. One that was brought about through the suffering of the punishment that we deserved. Jesus also suffered in that moment, from a true, deep spiritual thirst. One He had never experienced before. He suffered this on our behalf as well, so that we would never have to.

John 19:28-30

“After this, Jesus, knowing that all was now finished, said, “I thirst.” A jar full of sour wine stood there, so they put a sponge full of the sour wine on a hyssop branch and held it to his mouth. When Jesus had received the sour wine, he said, “It is finished,” and he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.

Psalm 22:15

“my strength is dried up like a potsherd, and my tongue sticks to my jaws; you lay me in the dust of death.”

Last Words: "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?"

Last Words: "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?"

March 24 2019 | Kyle Brenon | Psalm 22:1

This week we continue in our sermon series “Last Words” as we look at the final seven sayings of Christ from the cross. In His last moments, as darkness fell over the land, Jesus cries out to His Father, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” This truly is an earth-shattering moment! Jesus is not merely quoting from Psalm 22, but He is proclaiming the fulfillment of this prophetic Psalm. He is confirming a divine transaction. The evidence that our sin had indeed been placed on His shoulders. 2 Corinthians 5:21 says, "For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.” By God’s grace let us hold tightly to this truth, knowing that in Christ we have been reconciled, presented holy and blameless before him! (Colossians 1:22)